Category Archives: Inflammation

Exploring Pycnogenol® — A Natural Longevity Supplement

Pycnogenol®, a patented and widely known oral supplement with an extensive clinical research history, has also emerged as a promising supplement for healthy aging and longevity.

Sold under the trademarked name Pycnogenol®, the standardized formula is derived from French maritime pine bark and is widely recognized for its cardiovascular health benefits and ability to inhibit inflammation, supporting whole-body wellness and longevity.

As research continues to evaluate the potential of Pycnogenol® to impact several biological systems, increasing evidence suggests the use of the supplement may help with age-related conditions such as certain metabolic disorders, menopause-related symptoms, skin aging, and even cognitive decline. The pine bark extract appears to have therapeutic effects that suppress inflammation and oxidative stress protecting against multiple degenerative processes.

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Inflammation, Hormones, and Health: Navigating the Complex Connection

Systemic inflammation, often called chronic low-grade inflammation, can persist for long periods without apparent symptoms making it difficult to identify and manage. Common signs of inflammation, such as fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, skin changes, and cognitive issues, may often be mistaken for other conditions leaving many patients without a precise diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Chronic systemic inflammation contributes to the vast majority of chronic health conditions, including autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, hormone imbalances, and other serious health issues. As awareness of its role in disease pathogenesis grows, an expanding body of research furthers our understanding of the numerous and intricate connections between inflammation and aspects of health.

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The Future of CIRS

By: Andrew Heyman, MD, MHSA

It is difficult, if not dangerous, to predict the future. But trends and good data can point the way toward possibilities and probabilities. There is momentum building in our understanding of Chronic Inflammatory Response  Syndrome (CIRS), and the science has grown exponentially in the past 18 months thanks to transcriptomics. This new knowledge is sweeping our efforts forward in a  more defined direction while we hone our understanding of the disease. The future is coming into focus.

There are also larger moving parts within the general CIRS practitioner community and even external social and market forces that seem to be creating a set of likely outcomes that are both exciting and important.

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