Tag Archives: longevity

The Race to Longevity  

A growing body of research demonstrates significant discoveries and advancements in knowledge  into potential biomedical strategies for reversing the aging process. Today, researchers continue to study animal and human abilities to regenerate cells, aiming to diminish cognitive decline, immune system weakening, and other adverse effects of the biological aging process. Meanwhile, healthcare and biotech companies race to “find the key” to reversing the aging process, bringing the market valuation of anti-aging medicine to a projected $610 billion by 2025 from current estimates of $110 billion. Investors are pouring millions into start-up companies that focus on anti-aging and regenerative medical research, in hopes of being the first organization to make a breakthrough – bringing a successful solution to aging to the public.

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The Role of Sirtuins in Longevity

Despite strenuous controversies, the field of sirtuin research is growing with an increasing number of recent studies revealing their promising connection to longevity. After many years of investigation, understanding of the activity of the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) family (‘sirtuins’) has greatly expanded, proving its significant involvement in the regulation of many fundamental biological processes. Dr. Leonard Guarente, co-founder of Elysium Health and director of MIT’s Glenn Center for Biology of Aging, stands at the forefront of sirtuin research efforts.

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Preventing Dementia in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

According to data from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), an estimated 6% of people worldwide suffer from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in their 60s, and 37% are affected by age 85. Although patients with mild cognitive impairment have an increased risk of developing dementia, the condition does not always worsen and growing research aims to determine the underlying mechanisms linking the two. The progression from MCI, a slight but noticeable change in cognitive function, to dementia is not automatic; about 15% of MCI cases develop into dementia.

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