Tag Archives: mental health

Mental Health Awareness Month | Children in Crisis: An Emerging Mental Health Epidemic

Recent tragic events have underscored the importance of psychiatric wellness and sparked a national conversation surrounding the pressing need for improved mental health care. Despite increased attention, mental health is often overlooked as a vital component of overall pediatric health and wellbeing; in fact, many children who have psychological disorders remain undiagnosed due to a pervasive lack of awareness, education, and resources.

As mental, behavioral, and developmental disorders begin in early childhood and can severely progress if left untreated, it is paramount for clinicians, parents, and caregivers to remain aware of and attuned to children’s mental health, potential disorders, and their alarmingly high prevalence.

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Mental Health Awareness Month: New Breakthroughs in Gene Editing for Alcohol-Related Damage and Anxiety

The topic of mental health has been catapulted to the forefront of the healthcare community, with chronic stress, burnout, and loneliness rising significantly due to the pandemic and its long-lasting aftereffects. Each year, May celebrates Mental Health Awareness Month, a national movement working to raise awareness about mental health and its escalating prevalence, combat stigma, provide support, and educate the public.

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The Children’s Mental Health Crisis: How Social Isolation in Childhood Alters Brain Development and Function 

Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), and Children’s Hospital Association declared a national emergency in children’s mental health. Exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, mounting challenges across the spectrum of childcare have deepened disparities in pediatric primary care and are particularly evident in racial and ethnic minority groups. At the same time, pandemic conditions have led many children to lose their caregivers and forced them into increased social isolation – all of which has culminated in a mental health crisis among the youngest of the population.

Current statistics reveal the urgency of the problem at hand. According to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, emergency department visits for mental health emergencies rose by 24% in children aged between 5 and 11 years and by 31% in children aged between 12 and 17 years during March through October of 2020. In early 2021, emergency department visits for suspected suicide attempts increased by 51% among girls aged between 12 and 17 years as compared to data from the same period in 2019.

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