Tag Archives: mental health

Thyroid Awareness Month: The Connection Between Thyroid Disease and Mental Health

The end of January marks the conclusion of Thyroid Awareness Month, which aims to spread awareness of the thyroid conditions affecting over 20 million Americans. At present, many individuals live with undetected thyroid disease – up to 60% of patients are unaware of their condition. While the underlying causes of thyroid disease remain largely unknown, preventative measures are necessary, such as the routine evaluation of the thyroid to ensure early detection and diminish the risk of severe comorbidities.

Thyroid conditions can affect people of all ages, however, they affect women significantly more often than men. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism include restlessness, inability to focus, anxiety, weight loss, and tachycardia: all of which can be alleviated with appropriate treatment methods. However, emerging research reveals a connection between thyroid disease and the development of mental health conditions – which are not easily mitigated with treatment of thyroid dysfunction.

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Rising Suicide Rates Among College Students

Sunday, October 6th marks the beginning of Mental Illness Awareness Week 2019 across the United States, during which the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI) and other psychological support organizations come together to spread awareness and fight the stigma that remains enveloped in the conversation surrounding mental illness. Despite their prevalence – 1 in 5 adults will experience mental illness in this year alone – mental health conditions are often minimized and treated with less urgency than physical illness. This has allowed intentional self-harm to become the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and the 2nd most common cause among college students.

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Nature Exposure for Health Benefits Quantified  

Nature exposure has long been correlated to improved mental wellbeing and physical health, able to reduce blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and the production of stress hormones. A growing body of evidence implicates that greater exposure to or contact with natural environments can greatly benefit populations in high-income, largely urbanized societies, while merely living in a greener neighborhood has the potential to better health outcomes. Living in greener areas has been correlated to decreased risks of cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and mental distress, as well as increased longevity and improved self-reported health.

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