Author Archives: Zuzanna Walter

Could a Cognoscopy Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease Development?

Alzheimer’s disease is a complex, multi-faceted condition affecting nearly 47 million people worldwide, with 5.8 million Americans currently living with dementia in 2019. Already one of the leading causes of death in the United Kingdom, the disease is expected to rise to the forefront in the U.S. as heart disease and cancer treatments continue to improve. According to the 2019 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report, there has been an increase of 145% in Alzheimer’s related deaths between 2000 and 2017.

An estimated 75 million Americans are predisposed to developing Alzheimer’s disease, and this number is only expected to grow. New research suggests that the development of Alzheimer’s begins 20 or more years before any noticeable symptoms arise, allowing for a substantial window of time for intervention and prevention. With advancing technology and further research, there is potential to decrease the prevalence of Alzheimer’s to a much lower level by interceding at earlier stages than thought possible before.

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The Connection Between Food and Mood

The role of nutrition in the development of mood disorders has recently become a central focus of clinical research.  In recent years, public awareness of the intimate relationship between the brain and mental wellbeing has increasingly grown. The high metabolic and nutrient demands of the brain — which consumes 20% of a person’s daily caloric intake — suggest a connection between dietary choices and cognitive function, sparking a multitude of studies seeking to determine the specific connections of nutrients and mood disorders.

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The Genetics Behind Regeneration

Many animals are capable of regenerating complex body parts and restoring them to full functioning. Salamanders and planarians regrow damaged or missing body parts, while flatworms can replicate their entire bodies from minuscule components of themselves. The human body is comparatively limited in its ability to regenerate, as humans are only capable of renewing damaged organs such as the liver and skin. However, recent research in animal regeneration has revealed various stem cell strategies for regenerating body parts, that could one day be applied to humans.

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