Tag Archives: Brain health

The Link Between Parkinson’s & Gut Bacteria

Recent findings have confirmed a long assumed, yet never officially proven, hypothesis regarding a functional link between the gut’s bacteria and the onset of Parkinson’s disease. While previous research has demonstrated strong correlations between the gut and the disease, no research has shown the exact relationship.

One of the world’s most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s affects approximately 1 million people in the United States. A progressive and chronic movement disorder, Parkinson’s involves the malfunction and ultimate death of the brain’s vital nerve cells: neurons. As the neurons that typically produce normal levels of dopamine—the chemical that communicates with the segment of the brain that controls coordination and movement—regularly decrease and dopamine levels lessen, a person becomes unable to control movement. Worsening symptoms include the gradual deterioration of motor symptoms: body tremors, bradykinesia/slowness of movement, rigidity, and severe postural instability.

The studies suggest a new, unprecedented way of treating the disease and its symptoms: targeting the gut, rather than the brain, and developing next-generation probiotics: a more sophisticated version than those readily available for purchase and consumption today.

Through conducting trials during which mice were fed certain short-chain fatty acids that are commonly produced by bacteria in the gut, in addition to actual samples of gut bacteria from human Parkinson’s patients and healthy human controls, the team found that the mice either exhibited symptoms, or did not produce symptoms, respectively. The team’s researchers expressed their hope in the possibility of the prescription of drugs that contain bacteria to prevent Parkinson’s, or treat the disease symptoms. Moreover, the studies imply that Parkinson’s is less related to hereditary genetics than environmental factors—including the onset of age.

At A4M, our overarching goal is to treat—and ultimately prevent—the onset of diseases associated with aging. Attend our upcoming events and learn about the advancement of technology and biomedical engineering, coupled with the most recent research & inquiries into methods that optimize the human aging process.
 
Be on the forefront of public health and healthcare. Better yourself, your practice, and your patients through our advanced education opportunities.

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The Microbiome and Brain Health: Is there a Connection?

A4M World Congress Research is emerging and providing an understating for the ways in which bacteria living in the human gut—the gut microbiota—communicate with and influence brain health. The concept of a faulty “gut/brain axis” has been associated with various neurologic and psychiatric outcomes and is thought to be explained, at least in part, by immune dysfunction and inflammation triggered by poor gut health.

On Friday, May 8th keynote presenter David Perlmutter, MD will present cutting edge research and patient case examples on the importance of understanding the gut/brain axis and prescribing a healthy patient protocol for optimal outcome and prevention of further triggers that might include organs systems or immunological responses.

This one-of-a-kind academic event gives you premier access to top experts and medical pioneers in the fields of personalized and lifestyle medicine.

FULL CONFERENCE AGENDA

…And we have more! Workshops, sessions and lectures focused on the impact of gut microbiome and digestive health

Thursday, May 7
Pre Conference Workshop    |   7:30a – 5:30p
The Emerging Science and Role for the Microbiome for Health


Thursday, May 8
Afternoon Session    |   1:00a – 4:00p
Microbiome Diversity & Targeted Probiotics for Enhancing Health Outcomes


Thursday, May 9
Afternoon Session    |   1:00a – 4:00p
Microbiome Diversity & Targeted Probiotics for Enhancing Health Outcomes

Learn More      Register

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Physical Activity Keeps White Matter in Shape

White matter tracts enable communication between areas of the brain, but like the rest of the body, they decline with age. However, research suggests that staying active may help to preserve the integrity of these tracts. Agnieszka Burzynska, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Illinois, and colleagues used accelerometers to track physical activity in 88 healthy but “low-fit” participants aged 60 to 78. Results showed that older adults who engaged more often in light physical activity had greater structural integrity in the white-matter tracts of the temporal lobes, which play a key role in memory, language, and the processing of visual and auditory information. Conversely, those who spent more time sitting had lower structural integrity in the white-matter tracts connecting the hippocampus. “This relationship between the integrity of tracts connecting the hippocampus and sedentariness is significant even when we control for age, gender and aerobic fitness,” said Burzynska. “It suggests that the physiological effect of sitting too much, even if you still exercise at the end of the day for half an hour, will have a detrimental effect on your brain.”

Burzynska AZ, Chaddock-Heyman L, Voss MW, et al. Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are beneficial for white matter in low-fit older adults. PLoS One. 2014 Sep 17;9(9):e107413.  For more visit http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-09/uoia-slp091614.php

 

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