Tag Archives: Aging

The Importance of Physical Activity in Middle Age

The benefits of regular physical activity are well-established and well-documented, spurring public health efforts nationwide and urging the population to meet at least minimum exercise guidelines. Prior research has indicated that routine physical activity may decrease the risk for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and even certain cancers. However, most data stems from observational studies which assess physical activity at a single point in time and its effects on subsequent mortality and chronic disease outcomes.

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Carbohydrate Restriction for Delaying the Aging Process

In a growing aging population, increasing life expectancy is becoming a secondary concern to mitigating age-related disease and the associated repercussions. Improving health outcomes for rising older population is necessary to decrease the socio-economic burden of age-related disease, while promoting overall population health. Although the human lifespan has greatly expanded over the past century, good health and its maintenance remain topics of importance. Recently, dietary solutions to quelling the aging process have surged in popularity, with intermittent fasting, calorie restriction, and other diet plans spearheading the movement.

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The Role of Sirtuins in Longevity

Despite strenuous controversies, the field of sirtuin research is growing with an increasing number of recent studies revealing their promising connection to longevity. After many years of investigation, understanding of the activity of the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) family (‘sirtuins’) has greatly expanded, proving its significant involvement in the regulation of many fundamental biological processes. Dr. Leonard Guarente, co-founder of Elysium Health and director of MIT’s Glenn Center for Biology of Aging, stands at the forefront of sirtuin research efforts.

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