Healthy Aging Myths: Physical Deterioration and Impairment are Inevitable

As a result of incredible technological and scientific advances, human life expectancy has now doubled. According to data from the World Health Organization, the proportion of the world’s population over the age of 60 is expected to double from 11% to around 22% by the year 2050. With an increasing aging population at hand, it is important for healthcare professionals to combat the many medical myths surrounding the biological aging process which may detrimentally affect patient longevity and well-being.

Continue reading

Addressing Mental Health Among Athletes

Famed tennis player Naomi Osaka recently withdrew from the French Open due to concerns about her mental health; the athlete had suffered long depressive episodes and emphasized the unique pressures of being a high-profile athlete that led to her decision. Osaka’s example serves as an important reminder for the world of elite athletic competition, and can hopefully spur discussions concerning the importance of psychological wellbeing and mental health from tennis courts to the typical office environment.

Up until now, efforts to support elite athlete mental health have mostly centered on building literacy and awareness of the signs of disorders. While mental health awareness is necessary, it is not sufficient in addressing the varied and increasing psychologic needs of athletes. As such concerns increase among the population, clinicians can play a paramount role in supporting their patients’ mental health while being more conscious of the specific issue of athlete mental health to provide improved, holistic care.

Continue reading

Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month: Can Good Oral Health Help Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease?

The month of June observes Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month recognizing the over 50 million people living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other forms of dementia worldwide. Organizers of the campaign work to ameliorate a global lack of understanding of neurodegenerative diseases; they strive to inform, educate, and provide support for dementia sufferers and their loved ones.

A growing body of research has been able to identify several factors that may contribute to the development of the condition. Diabetes, hypertension, obesity, depression, cognitive inactivity, and other modifiable risk factors have all been associated with dementia, while many others are under investigation.

Continue reading